Tribute to Earth with Haiku Poems

 

EARTH DAY serves to remind us just how incredible and unique our home planet is. From her atmosphere to her rivers, Earth has everything we need to survive.

If we want to make sure future generations can thrive in Earth’s beauty, we must actively protect natural resources, care for other species and always choose to invest in learning more. Frankly, Earth doesn’t need us, but we need Earth, so let’s show her our love (and not just on Earth Day)!

Below: My expressions through 10 Earth haiku poems and photos of places that have left me in awe

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

***

Earth, I love you so

Mountains, rivers, trees and sky

A beauty beyond

 

***

Red rock above all

A copper desert sunset

Coyotes will howl

 

***

She lives in balance

In conserving momentum,

mass and energy

 

***

Vast lands were once lush

Now troubled and in danger

World to protect

 

***

Ocean meeting sky

Warm wind gentle and freeing

Breathing sea breeze air

 

***

Pillows in the sky

Bringing water to the ground

Freely floating past

 

***

Twisted at their base

through their webs of rooted life

Trees, swaying yet firm

 

***

Mountains that humble

Even the strong and mighty

A strength to reflect

 

***

Water carved canyons

Waves crashing, thunder roaring

Forces of nature
***

A place we call home

Free for us to be living

Uniting us all

 

Truly, Tashiana 

10420160_10152954082075955_4153010800566107624_n

 

Advertisements

New Zealand’s Incredible Clouds!

Shooting clouds over Mt. Cook (Aoraki)
             Shooting clouds over Mt. Cook (Aoraki)

For the past couple of months, I’ve been working on NSF research with Dr. Brian Billings that I’m very excited to share with you! Thousands of images of incredible New Zealand clouds Brian and I captured are now being used in our cloud stereo photogrammetry research. This work is tied with the DEEPWAVE Mission (several research centers are involved, including NCAR‘s Earth Observing Lab, Naval Research Lab-NRL, and New Zealand’s NIWA). 

DEEPWAVE aims to better understand the dynamics of internal atmospheric gravity waves; how moisture (that condenses into clouds) affects the grav-waves and how the waves affect the atmosphere and climate over a longer time frame (they have a big effect on the atmosphere’s momentum budget).  

The cloud stereo photogrammetry case I chose to focus on (June 13th shooting clouds over the ocean from Kumara Junction) will allow me to study coastal interactions and a possible barrier jet parallel to the West shore of the South Island.  This day provided stunning images that easily became my favorite of them all, as they capture the cumuliform clouds changing above AND the ocean waves moving below! Photos to come…

“Stratus”: Arahura Valley, New Zealand

THE PROCESS:  I shot with one camera (we cleverly call “Stratus”), while Brian shot with the other (“Cumulus”) at least 250 m away.  We first set the cameras on tripods so that we could see one another in the camera view at that distance, then turned each camera 90 degrees in order to capture images parallel to one another.  We tilted the cameras to view as much of the sky as possible. Using synchronized timers, we captured images on a set interval of every 5 or 10 seconds.

After each shoot, we saved our images on DVDs and even created time-lapse videos of the beautiful clouds using ImageJ! The main focus with our stereo photogrammetry is to measure the clouds and changes in them, so I’m now using a MATLAB Camera Calibration Toolbox and GPS measurements to perform calculations.  Using the triangulation measurements and algorithm results, I can determine how high clouds are and even their distance from mountains or other features to better understand and analyze conditions surrounding each day!

Good criteria for shooting:

  1. Clouds between clear and  overcast (with at least some breaks so it’s “scattered enough”); This way, we still have a clear view of the cloud base and cloud tops
  2. Would be nice to overlap with field/flight operations (if weather allows)—to capture images that correspond with NSF/NCAR HIAPER GV (research aircraft) flights and dropsondes AND Hokitika weather balloon launches (to represent upstream conditions for the flight)
  3. Smaller scale atmospheric features resulting from large-scale system—ex. fog forming under a ridge to look at how its form changes over time
  4. Strong cross-mountain winds–the mountains get in the way of the air flow, creating a disturbance that may cause gravity waves to form
  5. If there’s Easterly wind flow, we may see leeside weather phenomena (ex. gravity waves—lenticular “UFO” clouds) because of our location on the West side of mountains.  This would make us on the leeside of the mountain flow where all the action is!

It was quite an adventure scouting out the best locations for what we’re researching.  Many days ran long and late, but I loved it and have learned from it all.  All the while, I was  fortunate to do field work for NCAR on the DEEPWAVE mission and learn from incredible scientists!  I’m now working on stereo photogrammetric analyses for my Senior Thesis.  I presented preliminary results at the August AMS Mountain Meteorology Conference in San Diego and will be presenting more about the June 13th case at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting in San Francisco (December) and the 2015 American Meteorological Society (AMS) Meeting in Phoenix (January)! 

Check out our field mission here, and find details on our first flight here!  @TashianaOsborne for live updates.

Truly,

Tash

DEEPWAVE New Zealand!

Friday, June 6th, 2014 Hokitika, South Island, New Zealand

Thanks to NCAR EOL's Bill Brown for training me in! First DEEPWAVE upsonde launch earlier this week

First DEEPWAVE upsonde  launch earlier this week–  Thanks to NCAR EOL’s Bill Brown for training me in!

I’ve travelled all the way to beautiful Hokitika, New Zealand during NZ winter to work on the NSF/NCAR-EOL/Naval Research Lab DEEPWAVE mission.  I’ll be launching daily weather balloons (upsondes) from the Hokitika Airport and forecasting and monitoring days with conditions that may produce internal atmospheric gravity waves.  

These days are called Intensive Observing Periods (IOPs) where we’ll launch additional upsondes, and dropsondes will be released from NSF/NCAR’s HIAPER GV.  The HIAPER research aircraft is now in Christchurch and, on IOP days, will fly over regions where gravity waves are expected.  Data from these flights, upsondes, dropsondes, and various instruments will help us better understand the development of deeply-propagating gravity waves.  I’ll also be working on research involving stereo-photogrammetry with Dr. Brian Billings to provide more information on wave and cloud formation.  I’m thrilled to be part of DEEPWAVE and to be working with such talented individuals!

{Today’s actually a big day for DEEPWAVE New Zealand–our first Intensive Observing Period (IOP) to search for atmospheric gravity waves…Let the hunt begin!  I’ll post an update on the experience.

Truly,

Tash

 

 

Typhoon Soulik-Closing Eye

Typhoon Soulik is experiencing what meteorologists call an eyewall replacement cycle.  Major hurricanes commonly undergo this transformation when winds exceed 100 knots (115 mph/185 kph).  An outer eyewall can develop as the eye becomes smaller in size and surrounding thunderstorms intensify.  Soulik has weakened due to the outer wall overtaking the inner wall and closing the eye.  If the eye closes completely, the storm has a chance of strengthening once again.  This westward moving system, with winds of 95 knots (109 mph/175 kph) and higher gusts, remains a major threat to nearby regions.  It is expected to hit the southern end of Ishigaki-jima Island tomorrow morning (July 12, 2013), northern Taiwan later tomorrow, and China on Saturday (July 13, 2013).

Soulik's eye is was still open early this morning (July 11, 2013), but is becoming less distinguishable.

Soulik’s eye was still open early this morning (July 11, 2013), but was becoming less distinguishable.

12 hours later, clouds have closed in on Soulik's eye.

12 hours later, clouds have closed in on Soulik’s eye.